Board Meetings

Board meetings and board members, what are they for? A non-profit governing board serves many purposes. First and foremost, the board oversees financial and legal decisions. CAPSA’s governing board approves new hires and salary increases. They also make new policies such as our Donor Privacy Policy. CAPSA board members have also testified before the state legislature about the need for funding to ensure continued use of the LAP.

Board members provide support for CAPSA, it’s employees, it’s events and it’s mission. CAPSA board members assist the organization by helping organize and facilitate events. Throughout December, board members open and close the CAPSA gift wrap. During the spring, members help plan and execute the 5K, and members make invitations to friends, family and associates to attend events such as CAPSA’s Wine Pairing and Trivia Night.

Our board consists of university professors, accountants, law enforcement personnel, business owners, stay-at-home moms and lawyers. The diversity of our board members should be reflective of the valley. It should also allow for in-depth discussions about how CAPSA’s policies and practices will affect various community members. Domestic violence is no respecter of persons, and neither is our board. We want to know what the challenges and barriers would be to both a businesswomen and a police officer facing a domestic violence situation. By having a variety of backgrounds represented, a healthy dialogue can be created.

Board members are constant representatives of CAPSA. Board members tell their friends, family and colleagues about CAPSA and it’s latest initiatives. Board members invite their connections to Lunch with CAPSA or on a tour of our facilities, so that men and women throughout the valley can learn more about our services, and how we can help them. Board members are also advocates within the community.

Truthfully, our board members do a lot. There is no limit to their influence on CAPSA and it’s employees, and there’s no adequate way to express our gratitude for them.

Thank you to our board members: Beth Foley, Brad Franke, Chris Guymon, Christy Glass, Donna Alder, Jan Stander, Kacie Malouf, Mike Guthrie, Ronda Callister, Scott Stettler and Tara Williams. You all are amazing and do tremendous work on behalf of CAPSA.

To learn more about how a non-profit board should run, visit Nonprofits Are Messy by Joan Garry Consulting.

 

Domestic Violence Trivia

CAPSA’s Trivia Night is February 24, 2018. To get us in the spirit, we’ve created a set of trivia questions revolving around domestic violence. See how you do:

  1. Which state first rescinded the right of a man to inflict violence upon his partner?
  2. In what year did domestic violence become a federal crime?
  3. In what year did the first shelter for abused women and children open in the United States?
  4. Which film did the domestic violence term, “gaslighting” originate from?
  5. The classic Cycle of Abuse has four main stages: tension building, acute violence or acting out, reconciliation and what?
  6. True or False, domestic violence rates in Utah are higher than the national average.
  7. Including CAPSA, how many domestic violence shelters are there within the state of Utah?
  8. On average, how many times does an individual try to leave an abusive relationship before succeeding?

STOP!

It’s time to review your answers:

  1. Alabama was the first state to rescind this right in 1871. The defining case in the matter was Fulgham V. State.
  2. Domestic violence became a national crime when the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was passed by the United States Congress in 1994.
  3. The Women’s Advocates was the first domestic violence shelter in the U.S., and it opened its doors in 1974.
  4. The term gaslighting originated from the 1944 movie Gaslight. The term is used to describe a form of emotional abuse where the victim feels it is their fault for provoking the abuser to anger. Many individuals who have dealt with gaslighting feel they are going crazy and cannot do anything right.
  5. The Cycle of Abuse culminates in the Honeymoon or calm stage where the abuser is kind and loving toward their victim and they promise they will change and no longer be violent, controlling or manipulative.
  6. True. Nationally, 1 in 5 women and 1 in 7 men will be abused in their lifetime. In Utah, 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men will experience abuse.
  7. There are 16 domestic violence shelters throughout Utah.
  8. On average, it takes a survivor of domestic violence 7 attempts to escape before succeeding.

Learn more about domestic violence and how to help a loved one on the Get Help part of our website. If you or a loved one experiences or experienced abuse, call CAPSA at (435) 753-2500.

 

Lethality Assessment Protocol (LAP)

The Lethality Assessment Protocol or LAP, is a major tool used by both local law enforcement and CAPSA personnel. So, what is the LAP?

Originating from Maryland, Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell, of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, studied the factors associated with domestic homicide within the state. She studied these cases for more than 25 years, and from her study, she found 20 warning signs indicating an individual was at high risk of being killed by an intimate partner.

Inspired by this research, the State of Maryland worked with Dr. Campbell to create an 11 question assessment to be used by law enforcement. Now when a domestic violence call comes in, officers ask the victim of abuse these 11 questions. Depending on the answers, victims are determined whether or not they are at high risk of being murdered by their intimate partner. If at high risk, law enforcement personnel connect the individual to a local domestic violence shelter.

In the seven years since implementing the LAP in Maryland, domestic homicides have reduced by 60%. Since implementing this system in Utah, more than 1,500 individuals have been identified as being in a high-risk situation. Because of the LAP, these 1,500 individuals are receiving the help they are in need of. Before the LAP, only 4% of these at risk individuals visited a domestic violence shelter or sought any type of aid in preventing or dealing with their abusive situation.

We’re grateful for our law-makers and officers for making the LAP a life-saving part of our response to domestic violence within the state.

Learn more about CAPSA and the LAP at the links below:

CAPSA has a new tool to fight domestic violence

Local law enforcement agencies, CAPSA, collaborate to adopt domestic violence protocol

New program connecting domestic violence victims to resources

Policeman honored for implementing domestic violence victim assessment

An interview with NUVPEC chair, Ana Hernandez

Most of us probably haven’t heard of NUVPEC, but it stands for the Northern Utah Violence Prevention Education Coalition. To learn more about it, I interviewed the coalition chair, Ana Hernandez.

Q. Can you tell me the history of NUVPEC – when and how it was started?

A. In 2009, CAPSA’s prevention department completed a curriculum for male and female peer-to-peer discussion groups. At that time, CAPSA employees felt it was important to create a coalition.  It was called the Northern Utah Violence Prevention Education Coalition in order to address prevention efforts at the community level.

Our mission as a coalition is to reduce the incidences of sexual violence among youth in Cache County. The Northern Utah Violence Prevention Education Coalition aims to provide professional, respectful, sensitive and age appropriate prevention education to youth of all ages. NUVPEC will unite to implement developmental assets with an emphasis on positive values, social competencies and positive identities to help our future generations establish healthy, responsible and caring relationships.

Q. Who’s involved in NUVPEC?

A. Several organizations sit on NUVPEC: The Family Place, Alpha Chi Omega, the Logan Police Department, the Cache County’s Sheriff’s Office, Utah State University, Cache Makers, Pregnancy for Choices, the Department for Children and Family Services, Utah State’s Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information Office, Intermountain Healthcare, the Bear River Health Department and concerned citizens.

Q. What is NUVPEC doing in our community – what are the positive results you can point to from the program?

A. We hope that we are making a difference by raising awareness of domestic and sexual violence within our youth. Currently, we have several projects in the works.

Upstanding Youth Leadership Conference: Hosted at Utah State University on December 2, we have worked tirelessly with the Utah State Health Department and CAPSA to put this conference together. It is targeted specifically for Cache and Rich youth leaders, and we are hoping that by providing training by Marty Liccardo and other helpful workshops youth will be able to go back to their respective communities and teach their peers about making a difference and changing social norms.

Media Contest: Every year from January to the end of February the state of Utah holds a Media contest surrounding healthy relationships. This contest is for students, and NUVPEC participates by informing all the Middle and High School students about the contest and its theme.

Safe Dates: We partner with the Logan Police Department and the Fun Park to create an environment for youth to have fun while gaining an understanding of how to stay safe on a date and what to do if you feel uncomfortable at any portion of a night out.

Q. How are youth involved in NUVPEC?

A. NUVPEC raises awareness and holds events specifically for our youth. Members of the CAPSA Youth Council also help educate their peers with a member of NUVPEC.

Q. How does NUVPEC inspire and create youth leaders?

A. I hope that by making a difference the youth can see that they too can make a difference. A lot of times youth, and even adults, feel that in order to make a difference they have to be labeled as a leader. However, you do not have to be in any type of position (although it can be helpful) to make a difference and rise to inspire and be a leader.

Q. What have you learned from chairing NUVPEC?

A. When I started, I met with each member individually and listened to their concerns, ideas, and successes with the intention of making the coalition better. So far, I have been able to include more members from our community. I am also reaching out to the Latino community in hopes of bringing awareness to them,as well. I realize that although I am not perfect, I have learned that by showing others that I am human, that I care and that I am there to help them make a difference we become more united and are able to achieve more.

Q. What are the long-term goals of NUVPEC?

A. I want to continue inspiring youth to become the leaders of tomorrow. I also want to reach out to more community organizations and involve them in order to bring more awareness to families, and specifically youth.