24-hour crisis line
435-753-2500
If you are in immediate danger, call 911.

Sexual Assault and Rape Services

For more information about CAPSA services and how we can help you, please call our 24-hour hotline at 435-753-2500.

For information about what Rape and Sexual Assault is and how to recognize if you or someone you know needs help, click here.

Services Available:

24-hour telephone crisis line (435-753-2500)

CAPSA staff, advocates, and volunteers are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year (including holidays) on the crisis line to listen, talk, and help during a crisis. All calls are completely confidential.

NOTE: If you are under 18, and you give any identifying information to a CAPSA crisis line advocate such as your name, phone number, address, etc., CAPSA is required by law to report the assault to law enforcement.

24-hour mobile crisis response team

CAPSA has advocates on-call every single day, 24 hours a day to respond to a crisis. When law enforcement officers are called to a sexual assault or rape, they call CAPSA to send an advocate who will meet with the individual, help him/her understand what is happening, provide information about protective orders and civil stalking injunctions as appropriate, and provide referrals to agencies that can help with such things as emergency clothing, food, and counseling. An advocate can also meet with friends or family members of someone who has been raped or sexually assaulted and provide information to them on how to take care of their own needs as well as help their friend or family member.

Assistance with sexual assault forensic exams and law enforcement interviews

If you have been raped or sexually assaulted, you can come to CAPSA and meet with a caseworker. The caseworker can help you identify different options you have, and provide information and support for you. A caseworker can also help you complete and file a protective order or civil stalking injunction as appropriate. If you are under the age of 18, please be aware that CAPSA is required to report your assault to law enforcement. If you are 18 years of age or older, there is no requirement for a CAPSA caseworker to report it to law enforcement.

Those who have been raped or sexually assaulted who come to CAPSA within 5 days of the crime can choose to have a sexual assault forensic exam to collect evidence that may aid in prosecution of the crime. However, anyone that comes to CAPSA to receive help following a rape or assault is not required to participate in a forensic exam or report the rape to law enforcement*. It is important to know that medical personnel are required to make a police report whenever treating a person for injuries that resulted from a crime.  The individual still chooses whether or not to meet with or provide additional information to the police.  The decision to move forward with these procedures will be entirely up to the survivor, and can be discussed confidentially with a CAPSA advocate or caseworker.

Emergency shelter and food

CAPSA's shelter is a safe, confidential location where a victim of sexual assault or rape can stay if s/he does not feel safe at home. Our shelter can house up to 32 people (both adults and their accompanying children) with rooms for both small and large families, as well as rooms that are accessible to those with disabilities. We strive to make our shelter feel as much like a home away from home as possible for individuals in crisis situations.

Individual crisis intervention and case management

CAPSA has a full-time caseworker/advocate that specifically work with those impacted by rape and sexual assault, including friends or family members who are supporting the survivor. The caseworker is able to provide information, referrals and support following the traumatic experience of being the victim of a violent crime. All services provided by CAPSA are confidential and free of charge. Receiving assistance from CAPSA does not mean the person will have to talk to police, or that the crime will be reported to law enforcement*. Those decisions are made by the individual, and can be discussed confidentially with a CAPSA advocate.

Advocacy and coordination of services

The myriad of decisions, procedures and paperwork that surviviors of sexual assault or rape may have to deal with can be overwhelming, especially during such a stressful time of life. At CAPSA, we have many years of experience dealing with the court, law enforcement officers, medical professionals, and other agencies in Cache Valley. We are here to help our clients by coordinating services between law enforcement, criminal justice organizations, attorneys, doctors, religious leaders, mental health and social services agencies, and employers as needed. Our staff members are advocates for those we serve to ensure that they receive all the help and support they are entitled to. We also work very closely with the Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information Office (SAAVI) on the Utah State University campus to help sexual assault survivors who are also USU students.

Court advocacy

Although CAPSA does not provide any legal representation, advocates and caseworkers can attend court sessions to provide guidance and support during an investigation and legal proceedings if a person chooses to go forward with an investigation and/or prosecution of the crime.  CAPSA caseworkers can also help to arrange legal representaiton for some civil court hearings.

Educational support groups

Educational support groups are available for survivors of rape and sexual assault. These groups are not therapy sessions, but instead are a chance for survivors to meet together, discuss issues relevant to them, provide support for one another, and learn about and discuss options for the future.

Therapy Services